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Funding for groups to grow and retain Māori arts

Groups who want to see the arts thriving on their marae, are invited to apply for Toi Ake funding from Creative New Zealand.

Toi Ake supports iwi, hapū, whakapapa-based rōpu and māta waka to grow and retain Māori arts. Offered since 2005, Toi Ake projects usually focus on heritage arts including ngā mahi a Te Whare Pora, and te reo based arts including whaikōrero and whakapapa recitation; but contemporary arts projects are also supported.  Toi Ake supports the artworks of new wharenui but does not include restoration projects.

“Toi Ake aims to restore the mana of the arts to marae communities around the country by supporting the transfer of knowledge and skill from our tohunga to the next generation, while also enriching whānau and hapū identity through the beauty of art,” said Darrin Haimona, Chair of Te Waka Toi, the Māori arts board of Creative New Zealand. 

This year brings changes to Toi Ake. Now a single-stage funding programme, it focuses solely on putting arts projects into practice. Applicants must submit a current arts strategy, which outlines what is needed to cover the development of all aspects of their local arts. Applications can be made for up to $65,000.

Previously Toi Ake involved two application stages.  Applicants developed an arts strategy and then the same group reapplied to undertake an arts project outlined in the strategy.  While Toi Ake no longer funds the development of arts strategies, funding for such planning is now available through Creative New Zealand’s Quick Response grants.

Another change sees the net cast wider to include more groups. Mātā waka, or kinship groups living outside their traditional rohe/district, are also eligible to apply for funding.

Show latest news, more from February 2012.
Show more from the topic Indigenous arts policy.

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